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Breaking News: The FDA Finalizes Guidelines for the Updated Nutrition Facts FDA’s Final Ruling on New Nutrition Label Close at Hand

Written by Joomla Super User 10 November 2014
Whether you are a food manufacturer, a small startup or a food service provider, you are most likely aware of the FDA's proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label, including the proposed changes to serving sizes. The final decision will impact anyone that is required to provide nutrition facts for their product. After the announcement of the proposed changes in February 2014, there was a comment period which enabled the public to comment on the proposed changes. The comment period ended on August 1, 2014. Even with the comment period closing, there is still more to do on the FDA's proposed nutrition label changes.

Very often we receive calls from customers that are either concerned about the FDA's proposed changes or have questions about the changes. We participated in the comment period, ourselves, and voiced a concern about the proposed timeline for the industry to comply with the addition of required nutrients to the label. Like many who have commented, we sometimes wonder: did the FDA hear us and will it make a difference? Is this all we can do?

Just because the comment period ended on August 1st, interest and concern haven't. Instead of feeling helpless and irrelevant, let's start to fill the cup half way full and continue our efforts.

Bruce Silverglade, Principal Attorney at Olsson Frank Weeda (OFW), feels that being proactive is the way to go and offers ways in which we can still engage and impact the final decision. In his recent blog post Mr. Silverglade tells us, "Don't sit back and wait: Be proactive!" He explains, "Filing a comment with FDA is the first, not the last, step in participating in the development of a final regulation."

It can be of interest to know what others have submitted during the comment period. This can help shine a light on who else might share the same stance and who has an opposing perspective.

Mr. Silverglade goes on to encourage anyone in the food industry, who might have concerns, to request a meeting with Members of the House and Senate Committees. They have jurisdiction over FDA's annual appropriations, as well as leading the Members from Congressional committees that have FDA oversight responsibilities. These meetings can serve as a way to share concerns by discussing the impact as it relates to individual areas in the food industry that might be overlooked or aren't being considered merely because of a lack of awareness.

Bottom line, we can still make an impact on the final ruling and there are things that we can be doing to achieve this. Let's continue to work smart, use the available resources, agencies and organizations that are available to be heard, and just remember folks, it's not over...yet.

We are following these propsed changes closely. Check back here for breaking updates.

References:
http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/
http://agfdablog.com/2014/10/06/what-to-do-after-i-filed-my-comment-on-fdas-proposed-nutrition-facts-labeling-regulations/

Tagged under FDA proposed changes nutrition label FDA Nutrition Label Changes FDA regulations nutrition facts labels

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Breaking News: The FDA Finalizes Guidelines for the Updated Nutrition Facts FDA’s Final Ruling on New Nutrition Label Close at Hand

Written by Joomla Super User 10 November 2014
FDA Proposed Changes to Nutrition LabelWhether you are a food manufacturer, a small startup or a food service provider, you are most likely aware of the FDA's proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label, including the proposed changes to serving sizes. The final decision will impact anyone that is required to provide nutrition facts for their product. After the announcement of the proposed changes in February 2014, there was a comment period which enabled the public to comment on the proposed changes. The comment period ended on August 1, 2014. Even with the comment period closing, there is still more to do on the FDA's proposed nutrition label changes.

Very often we receive calls from customers that are either concerned about the FDA's proposed changes or have questions about the changes. We participated in the comment period, ourselves, and voiced a concern about the proposed timeline for the industry to comply with the addition of required nutrients to the label. Like many who have commented, we sometimes wonder: did the FDA hear us and will it make a difference? Is this all we can do?

Just because the comment period ended on August 1st, interest and concern haven't. Instead of feeling helpless and irrelevant, let's start to fill the cup half way full and continue our efforts.

Bruce Silverglade, Principal Attorney at Olsson Frank Weeda (OFW), feels that being proactive is the way to go and offers ways in which we can still engage and impact the final decision. In his recent blog post Mr. Silverglade tells us, "Don't sit back and wait: Be proactive!" He explains, "Filing a comment with FDA is the first, not the last, step in participating in the development of a final regulation."

It can be of interest to know what others have submitted during the comment period. This can help shine a light on who else might share the same stance and who has an opposing perspective.

Mr. Silverglade goes on to encourage anyone in the food industry, who might have concerns, to request a meeting with Members of the House and Senate Committees. They have jurisdiction over FDA's annual appropriations, as well as leading the Members from Congressional committees that have FDA oversight responsibilities. These meetings can serve as a way to share concerns by discussing the impact as it relates to individual areas in the food industry that might be overlooked or aren't being considered merely because of a lack of awareness.

Bottom line, we can still make an impact on the final ruling and there are things that we can be doing to achieve this. Let's continue to work smart, use the available resources, agencies and organizations that are available to be heard, and just remember folks, it's not over...yet.

We are following these propsed changes closely. Check back here for breaking updates.

References:
http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/
http://agfdablog.com/2014/10/06/what-to-do-after-i-filed-my-comment-on-fdas-proposed-nutrition-facts-labeling-regulations/

Tagged under FDA proposed changes nutrition label FDA Nutrition Label Changes FDA regulations nutrition facts labels

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FDA Proposed Rules for Nutrients Raises Concerns

Written by Beth Vessels 25 March 2014
nutrition label showing vitamin D, Potasium highlightedOne of the proposals set forth by the FDA earlier this month is to revise the nutrients that must be declared on a nutrition label. While the evidence and reasoning might very well support this change, the food labeling industry is concerned that the addition of the new nutrients required for labeling may cause some difficulty for food manufacturers to comply within a timely manner using a database software analysis.
This change is one a few that are categorized under ‘changes based on new nutrition science.’ Under this particular proposal, vitamin D and potassium would become newly required nutrients, along with calcium and iron – which are already required nutrients. Vitamin A and vitamin C would no longer be required nutrients on the label.
The FDA supports their proposal by explaining:
Vitamin D is important for bone development and general health among some populations which are currently inadequate in this nutrient.

Likewise, potassium is known to lower blood pressure and some populations are inadequate in this nutrient, as well.

The FDA feels removing vitamin A and C is acceptable, because current data shows that there are no deficiencies of these nutrients in populations.

The problem isn’t necessarily in making these a required nutrient, the FDA certainly makes a compelling argument. There is, however, some concern in the industry regarding the timeline for implementation.

It is not likely that you would see vitamin D & potassium data in the database for most or all foods within the 6 months that the FDA is currently proposing the industry have to prepare for the changes.

A leading software provider for database analysis nutrition labeling told us last week that they experienced a similar situation when trans fat was added as a requirement back in January 2006. They believe it will take quite some time for the USDA, manufacturers and other sources to update their nutrient data to include vitamin D and potassium – even beyond the deadline.

 

What does this mean for food manufacturers?

It could be a bumpy road when the two year compliance allowance time begins. Food companies that want to go ahead and update to the new nutrition facts label, by the way of database analysis, may have to wait until the database has been updated to include their ingredients’ vitamin D and potassium levels – which could be beyond the deadline given by the FDA.

Another option, for those companies who can’t afford to wait, could be Lab Analysis. Food nutritional analysis is more expensive and has longer turn-around compared to database analysis; however, it can determine any new required nutrients and could be a speedier alternative for those companies who don’t want to wait.

The database software company assures us that maintenance of the database is on-going and that they will update the database as quickly as possible once the FDA has finalized their ruling.

We encourage our customers to check back with us for updates on these FDA proposed changes to the nutrition facts label and once the ruling is finalized contact us. We will look into whether or not your particular ingredients have indeed been updated to include vitamin D and potassium – if this has indeed been included in their final ruling.

We’ve recently commented on this topic and you can track it on this link. Just enter this tracking number in the search box: 1jy-8b1y-z06d

Have you commented yet on the FDA’s site regarding this proposal? You should! This is a very important decision time for what will probably result in a change to the current nutrition facts label – let the FDA know your input. Here is the link: http://www.regulations.gov

Tagged under food labeling FDA proposed changes nutrition label FDA Nutrition Label Changes FDA regulations food label nutrition facts labels FDA standards food labels nutrition labeling retail food labels

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FDA Proposed Changes for Serving Size

Written by Bridget Bekrija 18 March 2014

food serving sizes changesRecently, the FDA proposed changes for serving size on Nutrition Facts Labels to better reflect new public health and scientific information. This proposed change is one of a few new proposals from the FDA regarding the content on the Nutrition Facts Label

Tagged under food labeling FDA proposed changes FDA Nutrition Label Changes FDA regulations FDA food label nutrition facts labels nutrition labeling food product labels

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FDA Proposed Changes to Nutrition Facts Label

Written by Beth Vessels 05 March 2014
FDA proposed changes to nutrition labels comparedThe nation is talking and the government is responding to demands for better nutrition disclosure from food manufacturers.

The FDA has officially announced an evaluation of the current nutrition fact label is underway and is now requesting comments from the public on their recommended changes.
RL Food Testing will be providing input to the FDA proposed changes to Nutrition Facts Labels during the comment period and look forward to helping our customers get into compliance as quickly as we are able once the FDA approves the new format.
There is a great deal of detail surrounding these changes. We have taken a shot at summarizing the facts and will continue to provide up to date information on this important FDA rule change.
Here are some questions and answers that may interest you related to this topic:

Tagged under food labeling FDA proposed changes FDA Nutrition Label Changes FDA regulations nutrition facts labels FDA standards food labels retail food labels nutrition analysis

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